basics trial

BaSICS Trial: Plasmalyte vs. 0.9% NaCl in the Critically Ill

In patients who need IV fluids, we can either provide "normal saline" or balanced salt solutions.Balanced salt solutions include Lactated Ringer's and Plasmalyte.There have been several trials trying to answer this question. The data hasn't been as rock solid as we'd like to convince our biases.The BaSICS trial is a recent landmark trial.As always, I …

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dka saline lactated

Saline or Lactated Ringers/Plasma-lyte for DKA Resuscitation?

When patients present to the ED in DKA, should we resuscitate them with 0.9% sodium chloride (saline) or balanced salt solutions such as plasma-lyte or lactated ringers?Many DKA order sets use 0.9% sodium chloride "aka normal saline" as their initial fluid of choice.We know these patients are dry when they arrive to the ED.They need …

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albumin resuscitation

Albumin in Resuscitation: Sepsis, Cardiac Surgery, & Other Indications

Albumin is a colloid that is frequently used in the resuscitation of critically ill patients. Amongst those indications we see it used in sepsis and very frequently in the cardiac surgery space. What prompted me to write this post was an article by Joannidis et al. published in Intensive Care Medicine last month. In that …

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plus trial

Plasma-lyte vs. Saline (0.9% NaCl): The PLUS Trial was a Negative Study

To begin, I will disclose my bias. I wanted plasma-lyte to outperform 0.9% NaCl, also called normal saline in critically ill patients. It turns out that after the publication of the PLUS trial, I have to chill the heck out to an extent. On this blog as well as social media, I have scrutinized 0.9% …

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fluid bolus 2

Fluid Bolus in Resuscitation: Pressure Bag vs. 999ml/hr on the IV Pump

A common scenario that occurs daily, heck even perhaps hourly, in most emergency departments or intensive care units around the world including providing patient with IV fluids rapidly via fluid bolus to resuscitate hypotensive patients or those who are in shock. In order to mitigate said hypotension/shock, the most common response by clinicians is to …

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The IV Fluid Guide: 0.9% NaCl, Ringers Lactate, Plasmalyte & Albumin

This page is a work in progress as a IV Fluid guide and will continue to grow throughout the years. Last updated on 3/3/22. This page is quite the mess right now if I am being honest. I will get it together at some point. Just many projects running simultaneously. Table of Contents for the …

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IV Fluid Overload: Don’t Drown your Patients!

The blood pressure is low, give a bolus of fluids. Many times that leads to a "nurse dose" as many of us joke about. But are we causing harm? I keep reiterating that fluid responsiveness is when you achieve an increase in cardiac index/output or an increase in stroke volume due to that fluid or …

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Resuscitation of Trauma Patients: 0.9% NaCl (saline) or Plasma-lyte?

I am not a trauma surgeon. I am not a trauma physician. I do not take care of trauma patients in my current practice. I did several rotations in the trauma intensive care unit during my fellowship training but by know means am I going to pretend to have the knowledge that my colleagues who …

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